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Physical Setting / Physics - New York Regents June 2012 Exam

Formats Worksheet / Test Paper Quiz Review

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Part A
Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (1–35): For each statement or question, choose the word or expression that, of those given, best
completes the statement or answers the question. Some questions may require the use of the 2006 Edition
Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics. Record your answers on your separate answer sheet.

   Base your answers to questions 1 and 2 on the
information below.
      In a drill during basketball practice, a
   player runs the length of the 30.-meter court
   and back. The player does this three times in
   60. seconds.
1 The magnitude of the player’s total displacement
  after running the drill is
  (1) 0.0 m                  (3) 60. m
  (2) 30. m                  (4) 180 m
Answer: 1

2 The average speed of the player during the drill is
  (1) 0.0 m/s               (3) 3.0 m/s
  (2) 0.50 m/s              (4) 30. m/s
Answer: 3

3 A baseball is thrown at an angle of 40.0° above
  the horizontal. The horizontal component of the
  baseball’s initial velocity is 12.0 meters per
  second. What is the magnitude of the ball’s initial
  velocity?
  (1) 7.71 m/s               (3) 15.7 m/s
  (2) 9.20 m/s               (4) 18.7 m/s
Answer: 3


4 A particle could have a charge of
  (1) 0.8 × 10−19 C         (3) 3.2 × 10−19 C
  (2) 1.2 × 10−19 C         (4) 4.1 × 10−19 C
Answer: 3

5 Which object has the greatest inertia?
  (1) a 15-kg mass traveling at 5.0 m/s
  (2) a 10.-kg mass traveling at 10. m/s
  (3) a 10.-kg mass traveling at 5.0 m/s
  (4) a 5.0-kg mass traveling at 15 m/s
Answer: 1

6 A car, initially traveling east with a speed of
  5.0 meters per second, is accelerated uniformly
  at 2.0 meters per second2 east for 10. seconds
  along a straight line. During this 10.-second
  interval the car travels a total distance of
  (1) 50. m                   (3) 1.0 × 102 m
  (2) 60. m                   (4) 1.5 × 102 m
Answer: 4

7 Which situation describes an object that has no
  unbalanced force acting on it?
  (1) an apple in free fall
  (2) a satellite orbiting Earth
  (3) a hockey puck moving at constant velocity
      across ice
  (4) a laboratory cart moving down a frictionless
      30.° incline
Answer: 3

8 A child riding a bicycle at 15 meters per second
  accelerates at −3.0 meters per second2 for
  4.0 seconds. What is the child’s speed at the end
  of this 4.0-second interval?
  (1) 12 m/s                 (3) 3.0 m/s
  (2) 27 m/s                 (4) 7.0 m/s
Answer: 3

9 An unbalanced force of 40. newtons keeps a
  5.0-kilogram object traveling in a circle of radius
  2.0 meters. What is the speed of the object?
  (1) 8.0 m/s               (3) 16 m/s
  (2) 2.0 m/s               (4) 4.0 m/s
Answer: 4

10 A 5.00-kilogram block slides along a horizontal,
   frictionless surface at 10.0 meters per second for
   4.00 seconds. The magnitude of the block’s
   momentum is
   (1) 200. kg•m/s             (3) 20.0 kg•m/s
   (2) 50.0 kg•m/s             (4) 12.5 kg•m/s
Answer: 2

11 A 0.50-kilogram puck sliding on a horizontal
   shuffleboard court is slowed to rest by a
   frictional force of 1.2 newtons. What is the
   coefficient of kinetic friction between the puck
   and the surface of the shuffleboard court?
   (1) 0.24                    (3) 0.60
   (2) 0.42                    (4) 4.1
Answer: 1

12 A number of 1.0-newton horizontal forces are
   exerted on a block on a frictionless, horizontal
   surface. Which top-view diagram shows the
   forces producing the greatest magnitude of
   acceleration of the block?

Answer: 1

13 On a small planet, an astronaut uses a vertical
   force of 175 newtons to lift an 87.5-kilogram
   boulder at constant velocity to a height of
   0.350 meter above the planet’s surface. What is
   the magnitude of the gravitational field strength
   on the surface of the planet?
   (1) 0.500 N/kg            (3) 9.81 N/kg
   (2) 2.00 N/kg             (4) 61.3 N/kg
Answer: 2

14 A car uses its brakes to stop on a level road.
   During this process, there must be a conversion
   of kinetic energy into
   (1) light energy
   (2) nuclear energy
   (3) gravitational potential energy
   (4) internal energy
Answer: 4

15 Which change decreases the resistance of a piece
   of copper wire?
   (1) increasing the wire’s length
   (2) increasing the wire’s resistivity
   (3) decreasing the wire’s temperature
   (4) decreasing the wire’s diameter
Answer: 3

16 A stone on the end of a string is whirled
   clockwise at constant speed in a horizontal circle
   as shown in the diagram below.
Which pair of arrows best represents the
directions of the stone’s velocity, v, and
acceleration, a, at the position shown?

Answer: 4

17 How much work is done by the force lifting a
   0.1-kilogram hamburger vertically upward at
   constant velocity 0.3 meter from a table?
   (1) 0.03 J                (3) 0.3 J
   (2) 0.1 J                 (4) 0.4 J
Answer: 3

18 Two electrons are separated by a distance of
   3.00 × 10−6 meter. What are the magnitude and
   direction of the electrostatic forces each exerts
   on the other?
   (1) 2.56 × 10−17 N away from each other
   (2) 2.56 × 10−17 N toward each other
   (3) 7.67 × 10−23 N away from each other
   (4) 7.67 × 10−23 N toward each other
Answer: 1

19 Which object will have the greatest change in
   electrical energy?
   (1) an electron moved through a potential
       difference of 2.0 V
   (2) a metal sphere with a charge of 1.0 × 10−9 C
       moved through a potential difference of 2.0 V
   (3) an electron moved through a potential
       difference of 4.0 V
   (4) a metal sphere with a charge of 1.0 × 10−9 C
       moved through a potential difference of 4.0 V
Answer: 4

20 The resistance of a circuit remains constant.
   Which graph best represents the relationship
   between the current in the circuit and the
   potential difference provided by the battery?

Answer: 4

21 The wavelength of a wave doubles as it travels
   from medium A into medium B. Compared to the
   wave in medium A, the wave in medium B has
   (1) half the speed
   (2) twice the speed
   (3) half the frequency
   (4) twice the frequency
Answer: 2

22 The watt•second is a unit of
   (1) power
   (2) energy
   (3) potential difference
   (4) electric field strength
Answer: 2

23 Which quantity has both a magnitude and a
   direction?
   (1) energy            (3) power
   (2) impulse           (4) work
Answer: 2

24 A tuning fork vibrates at a frequency of 512 hertz
   when struck with a rubber hammer. The sound
   produced by the tuning fork will travel through
   the air as a
   (1) longitudinal wave with air molecules
       vibrating parallel to the direction of travel
   (2) transverse wave with air molecules vibrating
       parallel to the direction of travel
   (3) longitudinal wave with air molecules vibrating
       perpendicular to the direction of travel
   (4) transverse wave with air molecules vibrating
       perpendicular to the direction of travel
Answer: 1

25 A 3-ohm resistor and a 6-ohm resistor are
   connected in parallel across a 9-volt battery.
   Which statement best compares the potential
   difference across each resistor?
   (1) The potential difference across the 6-ohm
        resistor is the same as the potential
        difference across the 3-ohm resistor.
   (2) The potential difference across the 6-ohm
        resistor is twice as great as the potential
        difference across the 3-ohm resistor.
   (3) The potential difference across the 6-ohm
        resistor is half as great as the potential
        difference across the 3-ohm resistor.
   (4) The potential difference across the 6-ohm
        resistor is four times as great as the potential
        difference across the 3-ohm resistor.
Answer: 1

26 A 3.6-volt battery is used to operate a cell phone
   for 5.0 minutes. If the cell phone dissipates
   0.064 watt of power during its operation, the
   current that passes through the phone is
   (1) 0.018 A                (3) 19 A
   (2) 5.3 A                  (4) 56 A
Answer: 1

27 A monochromatic beam of light has a frequency
   of 7.69 × 1014 hertz. What is the energy of a
   photon of this light?
   (1) 2.59 × 10−40 J     (3) 5.10 × 10−19 J
   (2) 6.92 × 10−31 J     (4) 3.90 × 10−7 J
Answer: 3

28 A 3.00 × 10−9-coulomb test charge is placed near
   a negatively charged metal sphere. The sphere
   exerts an electrostatic force of magnitude
   6.00 × 10−5 newton on the test charge. What is
   the magnitude and direction of the electric field
   strength at this location?
   (1) 2.00 × 104 N/C directed away from the
       sphere
   (2) 2.00 × 104 N/C directed toward the sphere
   (3) 5.00 × 10−5 N/C directed away from the
       sphere
   (4) 5.00 × 10−5 N/C directed toward the sphere
Answer: 2

29 What is characteristic of both sound waves and
   electromagnetic waves?
   (1) They require a medium.
   (2) They transfer energy.
   (3) They are mechanical waves.
   (4) They are longitudinal waves.
Answer: 2

30 A small object is dropped through a loop of wire
   connected to a sensitive ammeter on the edge of
   a table, as shown in the diagram below.
A reading on the ammeter is most likely
produced when the object falling through the
loop of wire is a
(1) flashlight battery (3) brass mass
(2) bar magnet         (4) plastic ruler
Answer: 2

31 What is the wavelength of a 2.50-kilohertz sound
   wave traveling at 326 meters per second through
   air?
   (1) 0.130 m              (3) 7.67 m
   (2) 1.30 m               (4) 130. m
Answer: 1

32 Ultrasound is a medical technique that transmits
   sound waves through soft tissue in the human
   body. Ultrasound waves can break kidney stones
   into tiny fragments, making it easier for them to
   be excreted without pain. The shattering of
   kidney stones with specific frequencies of sound
   waves is an application of which wave
   phenomenon?
   (1) the Doppler effect (3) refraction
   (2) reflection            (4) resonance
Answer: 4

33 In the diagram below, a stationary source located
   at point S produces sound having a constant
   frequency of 512 hertz. Observer A, 50. meters to
   the left of S, hears a frequency of 512 hertz.
   Observer B, 100. meters to the right of S, hears a
   frequency lower than 512 hertz.
Which statement best describes the motion of
the observers?
(1) Observer A is moving toward point S, and
    observer B is stationary.
(2) Observer A is moving away from point S, and
    observer B is stationary.
(3) Observer A is stationary, and observer B is
    moving toward point S.
(4) Observer A is stationary, and observer B is
    moving away from point S.
Answer: 4

34 While sitting in a boat, a fisherman observes that
   two complete waves pass by his position every
   4 seconds. What is the period of these waves?
   (1) 0.5 s                   (3) 8 s
   (2) 2 s                     (4) 4 s
Answer: 2

35 A wave passes through an opening in a barrier.
   The amount of diffraction experienced by the
   wave depends on the size of the opening and the
   wave’s
   (1) amplitude           (3) velocity
   (2) wavelength          (4) phase
Answer: 2


Part B–1
Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (36–50): For each statement or question, choose the word or expression that, of those given, best
completes the statement or answers the question. Some questions may require the use of the 2006 Edition
Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics. Record your answers on your separate answer sheet.

36 The length of a football field is closest to
   (1) 1000 cm                (3) 1000 km
   (2) 1000 dm                (4) 1000 mm
Answer: 2

37 A student on an amusement park ride moves in a
   circular path with a radius of 3.5 meters once
   every 8.9 seconds. The student moves at an
   average speed of
   (1) 0.39 m/s             (3) 2.5 m/s
   (2) 1.2 m/s              (4) 4.3 m/s
Answer: 3

38 When a 1.0-kilogram cart moving with a speed of
   0.50 meter per second on a horizontal surface
   collides with a second 1.0-kilogram cart initially
   at rest, the carts lock together. What is the speed
   of the combined carts after the collision?
   [Neglect friction.]
   (1) 1.0 m/s                 (3) 0.25 m/s
   (2) 0.50 m/s                (4) 0 m/s
Answer: 3

39 Two elevators, A and B, move at constant speed.
   Elevator B moves with twice the speed of
   elevator A. Elevator B weighs twice as much as
   elevator A. Compared to the power needed to lift
   elevator A, the power needed to lift elevator B is
   (1) the same             (3) half as great
   (2) twice as great       (4) four times as great
Answer: 4

40 What is the maximum height to which a motor
   having a power rating of 20.4 watts can lift a
   5.00-kilogram stone vertically in 10.0 seconds?
   (1) 0.0416 m              (3) 4.16 m
   (2) 0.408 m               (4) 40.8 m
Answer: 3

41 What is the current in a wire if 3.4 × 1019
   electrons pass by a point in this wire every
   60. seconds?
   (1) 1.8 × 10−18 A      (3) 9.1 × 10−2 A
   (2) 3.1 × 10−11 A      (4) 11 A
Answer: 3

42 Which graph represents the relationship
   between the magnitude of the gravitational force
   exerted by Earth on a spacecraft and the distance
   between the center of the spacecraft and center
   of Earth? [Assume constant mass for the
   spacecraft.]

Answer: 4

43 To increase the brightness of a desk lamp, a
   student replaces a 50-watt incandescent
   lightbulb with a 100-watt incandescent lightbulb.
   Compared to the 50-watt lightbulb, the 100-watt
   lightbulb has
   (1) less resistance and draws more current
   (2) less resistance and draws less current
   (3) more resistance and draws more current
   (4) more resistance and draws less current
Answer: 1

44 Electrons in excited hydrogen atoms are in the
   n = 3 energy level. How many different photon
   frequencies could be emitted as the atoms return
   to the ground state?
   (1) 1                    (3) 3
   (2) 2                    (4) 4
Answer: 3

45 The diagram below represents a setup for demonstrating motion.
When the lever is released, the support rod withdraws from ball B, allowing it to fall. At the same instant,
the rod contacts ball A, propelling it horizontally to the left. Which statement describes the motion that is
observed after the lever is released and the balls fall? [Neglect friction.]
(1) Ball A travels at constant velocity.
(2) Ball A hits the tabletop at the same time as ball B.
(3) Ball B hits the tabletop before ball A.
(4) Ball B travels with an increasing acceleration.
Answer: 2

46 Two speakers, S1 and S2, operating in phase in the same medium produce the circular wave patterns shown
   in the diagram below.
At which two points is constructive interference occurring?
(1) A and B                                               (3) B and C
(2) A and D                                               (4) B and D
Answer: 2

47 A 100.0-kilogram boy and a 50.0-kilogram girl, each holding a spring scale, pull against each other as shown
   in the diagram below.
The graph below shows the relationship between the magnitude of the force that the boy applies on his
spring scale and time.
                                       Boy’s Force vs. Time
Which graph best represents the relationship between the magnitude of the force that the girl applies on
her spring scale and time?

Answer: 1

48 In which diagram do the field lines best
   represent the gravitational field around Earth?

Answer: 1

49 A ray of light ( f = 5.09 × 1014 Hz) travels through
   various substances. Which graph best represents
   the relationship between the absolute index of
   refraction of these substances and the
   corresponding speed of light in these substances?

Answer: 4

50 A pendulum is made from a 7.50-kilogram mass
   attached to a rope connected to the ceiling of a
   gymnasium. The mass is pushed to the side until
   it is at position A, 1.5 meters higher than its
   equilibrium position. After it is released from
   rest at position A, the pendulum moves freely
   back and forth between positions A and B, as
   shown in the diagram below.
What is the total amount of kinetic energy that
the mass has as it swings freely through its
equilibrium position? [Neglect friction.]
(1) 11 J                (3) 110 J
(2) 94 J                (4) 920 J
Answer: 3


Part B–2
Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (51–65): Record your answers in the spaces provided in your answer booklet. Some questions
may require the use of the 2006 Edition Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics.

Base your answers to questions 51 through 53 on the information below.
      A student produced various elongations of a spring by applying a series of forces to the spring.
  The graph below represents the relationship between the applied force and the elongation of the
  spring.
                                       Force vs. Elongation
51 Determine the spring constant of the spring. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
51 [1] Allow 1 credit for 20. N/m.


52–53 Calculate the energy stored in the spring when the elongation is 0.30 meter. [Show all work, including
      the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
52 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units or for an answer that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 51. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations in this rating guide.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
53 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer that is consistent with the student’s
       response to question 52.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            PEs = 0.90 J
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 52–53.


54–55 Calculate the time required for a 6000.-newton net force to stop a 1200.-kilogram car initially
      traveling at 10. meters per second. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with
      units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
54 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for
       Calculations in this rating guide.
       Examples of 1-credit responses:
55 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer that is consistent with the student’s
       response to question 54.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
             t = 2.0 s
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 54–55.


56–57 A toy rocket is launched twice into the air from level ground and returns to level ground. The rocket
      is first launched with initial speed v at an angle of 45° above the horizontal. It is launched the second
      time with the same initial speed, but with the launch angle increased to 60.° above the horizontal.
      Describe how both the total horizontal distance the rocket travels and the time in the air are affected
      by the increase in launch angle. [Neglect friction.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
56 [1] Allow 1 credit for stating that the total horizontal distance would decrease.
57 [1] Allow 1 credit for stating that the time in the air would increase.


58–59 Calculate the magnitude of the average gravitational force between Earth and the Moon. [Show all
      work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
58 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for
       Calculations in this rating guide.
       Example of a 1-credit response:
59 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer that is consistent with the student’s
       response to question 58.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            Fg = 1.99 × 1020 N
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 58–59.


   Base your answers to questions 60 through 63 on the information below.
          A 15-ohm resistor and a 20.-ohm resistor are connected in parallel with a 9.0-volt battery. A
      single ammeter is connected to measure the total current of the circuit.
60–61 In the space in your answer booklet, draw a diagram of this circuit using symbols from the Reference
      Tables for Physical Setting/Physics. [Assume the availability of any number of wires of negligible
      resistance.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
60 [1] Allow 1 credit for drawing a parallel circuit containing two resistors or lamps and a battery or a cell.
61 [1] Allow 1 credit for correct placement of the ammeter.
        Example of a 2-credit response for questions 60–61:


62–63 Calculate the equivalent resistance of the circuit. [Show all work, including the equation and
      substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
62 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units or for an answer that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 60. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
63 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer that is consistent with the student’s
       response to question 62.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            Req = 8.6 Ω
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 62–63.


Base your answers to questions 64 and 65 on the diagram below, which shows a wave in a rope.
64 Determine the wavelength of the wave. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
64 [1] Allow 1 credit for 3.2 m.


65 Determine the amplitude of the wave. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
65 [1] Allow 1 credit for 0.60 m.



Part C
Answer all questions in this part.
    Directions (66–85): Record your answers in the spaces provided in your answer booklet. Some questions
may require the use of the 2006 Edition Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics.

       Base your answers to questions 66 through 70 on the information below.
             A runner accelerates uniformly from rest to a speed of 8.00 meters per second. The kinetic
         energy of the runner was determined at 2.00-meter-per-second intervals and recorded in the data
         table below.
                                                 Data Table
                                     Speed (m/s)      Kinetic Energy (J)
                                         0.00                    0.00
                                         2.00                  140.
                                         4.00                  560.
                                         6.00                1260
                                         8.00                2240
    Directions (66–67): Using the information in the data table, construct a graph on the grid in your answer
booklet following the directions below.
       66 Plot the data points for kinetic energy of the runner versus his speed. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
66 [1] Allow 1 credit for correctly plotting all points ± 0.3 grid space.


67 Draw the line or curve of best fit. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
67 [1] Allow 1 credit for drawing the line or curve of best fit.
        Example of a 2-credit graph for questions 66 and 67:
                                  Kinetic Energy vs. Speed
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 66.


68–69 Calculate the mass of the runner. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
68 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units or for an answer that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 67. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
69 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer consistent with the student’s
       response to question 67 and/or 68.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
           70.0 kg
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 68–69.


70 A soccer player having less mass than the runner also accelerates uniformly from rest to a speed of
   8.00 meters per second. Compare the kinetic energy of the less massive soccer player to the kinetic
   energy of the more massive runner when both are traveling at the same speed. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
70 [1] Allow 1 credit for indicating that the less massive soccer player has less kinetic energy.


Base your answers to questions 71 through 75 on the information below.
      A river has a current flowing with a velocity of 2.0 meters per second due east. A boat is
  75 meters from the north riverbank. It travels at 3.0 meters per second relative to the river and is
  headed due north. In the diagram below, the vector starting at point P represents the velocity of
  the boat relative to the river water.
71–72 Calculate the time required for the boat to cross the river. [Show all work, including the equation and
      substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
71 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for
       Calculations in this rating guide.
       Example of a 1-credit response:
72 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer consistent with the student’s
       response to question 71.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
           t = 25 s
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 71–72.


73 On the diagram in your answer booklet, use a ruler and protractor to construct a vector
   representing the velocity of the river current. Begin the vector at point P and use a scale of
   1.0 centimeter = 0.50 meter per second. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
73 [1] Allow 1 credit for a vector 4.0 cm ± 0.2 cm long, directed to the east. Do not allow credit if the
       arrowhead is missing or if the arrowhead is pointing in the wrong direction.
        Example of a 1-credit response for question 73 and a 1-credit response for question 74:
Note: Allow credit even if the vector does not start at point P.
      The graphical solution for the resultant, R, shown above, represents the graphical response to
      question 74.


74–75 Calculate or find graphically the magnitude of the resultant velocity of the boat. [Show all work,
      including the equation and substitution with units or construct the resultant velocity vector in your
      answer booklet for question 73, using a scale of 1.0 centimeter = 0.50 meter per second. The value
      of the magnitude must be written in your answer booklet in the space for questions 74–75.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
74 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for
       Calculations in this rating guide.
       Examples of 1-credit responses:
                               or
For a graphic response, allow 1 credit for constructing a vector diagram in the student answer
space for question 73, with a resultant vector 7.2 cm ± 0.2 cm long or for an answer that is consis-
tent with the student’s response to question 73. To receive this credit, the arrowheads must be cor-
rectly drawn.
75 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer that is consistent with the student’s
       response to question 73 and/or 74.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
        c = 3.6 m/s    or     hypotenuse = 3.6 m/s      or    R = 3.6 m/s
                                          or
        For a graphic response, allow 1 credit for 3.6 m/s ± 0.1 m/s.
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 74–75.


Base your answers to questions 76 through 80 on the information below.
      A light ray ( f = 5.09 × 1014 Hz) is refracted as it travels from water into flint glass. The path of
  the light ray in the flint glass is shown in the diagram below.
76 Using a protractor, measure the angle of refraction of the light ray in the flint glass. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
76 [1] Allow 1 credit for 37° ± 2°.


77–78 Calculate the angle of incidence for the light ray in water. [Show all work, including the equation and
      substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
77 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units or for an answer that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 76. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
78 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer consistent with the student’s
       response to question 77.
       Example of a 1-credit response:
           θ1 = 49°
       Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 77–78.


79 Using a protractor and straightedge, on the diagram in your answer booklet, draw the path of the
   incident light ray in the water. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
79 [1] Allow 1 credit for drawing the incident ray at an angle of incidence of 49° ± 2°.
        Example of a 1-credit response:

Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 78.


80 Identify one physical event, other than transmission or refraction, that occurs as the light interacts
   with the water-flint glass boundary. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
 Allow 1 credit. Acceptable responses include, but are not limited to:
            — reflection
            — absorption
            — The speed of the wave decreases upon entering the flint glass.
            — wavelength decreases


Base your answers to questions 81 through 85 on the information below.
       Two experiments running simultaneously at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in
  Batavia, Ill., have observed a new particle called the cascade baryon. It is one of the most massive
  examples yet of a baryon—a class of particles made of three quarks held together by the strong
  nuclear force—and the first to contain one quark from each of the three known families, or
  generations, of these elementary particles.
       Protons and neutrons are made of up and down quarks, the two first-generation quarks. Strange
  and charm quarks constitute the second generation, while the top and bottom varieties make up
  the third. Physicists had long conjectured that a down quark could combine with a strange and a
  bottom quark to form the three-generation cascade baryon.
       On June 13, the scientists running Dzero, one of two detectors at Fermilab’s Tevatron
  accelerator, announced that they had detected characteristic showers of particles from the decay of
  cascade baryons. The baryons formed in proton-antiproton collisions and lived no more than a
  trillionth of a second. A week later, physicists at CDF, the Tevatron’s other detector, reported their
  own sighting of the baryon...
                      Source: D.C., “Pas de deux for a three-scoop particle,” Science News, Vol. 172, July 7, 2007
81 Which combination of three quarks will produce a neutron? [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
 Allow 1 credit for udd or up, down, down.


82 What is the magnitude and sign of the charge, in elementary charges, of a cascade baryon? [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
 Allow 1 credit for −1e. Do not allow credit if the negative sign is missing.


83 The Tevatron derives its name from teraelectronvolt, the maximum energy it can impart to a particle.
   Determine the energy, in joules, equivalent to 1.00 teraelectronvolt. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
 Allow 1 credit for 1.60 × 10−7 J.


84–85 Calculate the maximum total mass, in kilograms, of particles that could be created in the head-on
      collision of a proton and an antiproton, each having an energy of 1.60 × 10−7 joule. [Show all work,
      including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
84 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitutions with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for
       Calculations in this rating guide.
       Examples of 1-credit responses:
85 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer consistent with the student’s
       response to question 84.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
           m = 3.56 × 10−24 kg or     m total = 3.56 × 10−24 kg
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 84–85.



  Try the Quiz :     Physical Setting / Physics - New York Regents June 2012 Exam


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