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Regents June 2015 Exam

Formats Worksheet / Test Paper Quiz Review

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                                                   Part A
                                     Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (1–35): For each statement or question, choose the word or expression that, of those given, best
completes the statement or answers the question. Some questions may require the use of the 2006 Edition
Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics. Record your answers on your separate answer sheet.
1 Which quantities are scalar?
  (1) speed and work
  (2) velocity and force
  (3) distance and acceleration
  (4) momentum and power
Answer: 1

2 A 3.00-kilogram mass is thrown vertically upward
  with an initial speed of 9.80 meters per second.
  What is the maximum height this object will
  reach? [Neglect friction.]
  (1) 1.00 m                 (3) 9.80 m
  (2) 4.90 m                 (4) 19.6 m
Answer: 2

3 An airplane traveling north at 220. meters per
  second encounters a 50.0-meters-per-second
  crosswind from west to east, as represented in
  the diagram below.
What is the resultant speed of the plane?
(1) 170. m/s              (3) 226 m/s
(2) 214 m/s               (4) 270. m/s
Answer: 3


4 A 160.-kilogram space vehicle is traveling along a
  straight line at a constant speed of 800. meters
  per second. The magnitude of the net force on
  the space vehicle is

Answer: 1

5 A student throws a 5.0-newton ball straight up.
  What is the net force on the ball at its maximum
  height?
  (1) 0.0 N                 (3) 5.0 N, down
  (2) 5.0 N, up             (4) 9.8 N, down
Answer: 3

6 A vertical spring has a spring constant of
  100. newtons per meter. When an object is
  attached to the bottom of the spring, the spring
  changes from its unstretched length of 0.50 meter
  to a length of 0.65 meter. The magnitude of the
  weight of the attached object is
  (1) 1.1 N                 (3) 50. N
  (2) 15 N                  (4) 65 N
Answer: 2

7 A 1.5-kilogram cart initially moves at 2.0 meters
  per second. It is brought to rest by a constant net
  force in 0.30 second. What is the magnitude of
  the net force?
  (1) 0.40 N                 (3) 10. N
  (2) 0.90 N                 (4) 15 N
Answer: 3

8 Which characteristic of a light wave must increase
  as the light wave passes from glass into air?
  (1) amplitude               (3) period
  (2) frequency               (4) wavelength
Answer: 4

9 As a 5.0 × 102-newton basketball player jumps
  from the floor up toward the basket, the
  magnitude of the force of her feet on the floor is
  1.0 × 103 newtons. As she jumps, the magnitude
  of the force of the floor on her feet is
  (1) 5.0 × 102 N            (3) 1.5 × 103 N
  (2) 1.0 × 103 N            (4) 5.0 × 105 N
Answer: 2

10 A 0.0600-kilogram ball traveling at 60.0 meters
   per second hits a concrete wall. What speed
   must a 0.0100-kilogram bullet have in order to
   hit the wall with the same magnitude of
   momentum as the ball?
   (1) 3.60 m/s             (3) 360. m/s
   (2) 6.00 m/s             (4) 600. m/s
Answer: 3

11 The Hubble telescope’s orbit is 5.6 × 105 meters
   above Earth’s surface. The telescope has a mass
   of 1.1 × 104 kilograms. Earth exerts a gravitational
   force of 9.1 × 104 newtons on the telescope. The
   magnitude of Earth’s gravitational field strength
   at this location is
   (1) 1.5 × 10−20 N/kg       (3) 8.3 N/kg
   (2) 0.12 N/kg              (4) 9.8 N/kg
Answer: 3

12 When two point charges are a distance d apart,
   the magnitude of the electrostatic force between
   them is F. If the distance between the point
   charges is increased to 3d, the magnitude of the
   electrostatic force between the two charges will be

Answer: 1

13 A radio operating at 3.0 volts and a constant
   temperature draws a current of 1.8 × 10−4 ampere.
   What is the resistance of the radio circuit?
   (1) 1.7 × 104 Ω           (3) 5.4 × 10−4 Ω
   (2) 3.0 × 101 Ω           (4) 6.0 × 10−5 Ω
Answer: 1

14 Which energy transformation occurs in an
   operating electric motor?
   (1) electrical → mechanical
   (2) mechanical → electrical
   (3) chemical → electrical
   (4) electrical → chemical
Answer: 1

15 A block slides across a rough, horizontal tabletop.
   As the block comes to rest, there is an increase in
   the block-tabletop system’s
   (1) gravitational potential energy
   (2) elastic potential energy
   (3) kinetic energy
   (4) internal (thermal) energy
Answer: 4


16 How much work is required to move an electron
   through a potential difference of 3.00 volts?

Answer: 2

17 During a laboratory experiment, a student finds
   that at 20° Celsius, a 6.0-meter length of copper
   wire has a resistance of 1.3 ohms. The cross-
   sectional area of this wire is

Answer: 1

18 A net charge of 5.0 coulombs passes a point on a
   conductor in 0.050 second. The average current is

Answer: 4

19 If several resistors are connected in series in
   an electric circuit, the potential difference across
   each resistor
   (1) varies directly with its resistance
   (2) varies inversely with its resistance
   (3) varies inversely with the square of its
       resistance
   (4) is independent of its resistance
Answer: 1

20 The amplitude of a sound wave is most closely
   related to the sound’s
   (1) speed              (3) loudness
   (2) wavelength         (4) pitch
Answer: 3

21 A duck floating on a lake oscillates up and down
   5.0 times during a 10.-second interval as a
   periodic wave passes by. What is the frequency
   of the duck’s oscillations?
   (1) 0.10 Hz                 (3) 2.0 Hz
   (2) 0.50 Hz                 (4) 50. Hz
Answer: 2

22 Which diagram best represents the position of
   a ball, at equal time intervals, as it falls freely
   from rest near Earth’s surface?

Answer: 2

23 A gamma ray and a microwave traveling in a
   vacuum have the same
   (1) frequency        (3) speed
   (2) period           (4) wavelength
Answer: 3

24 A student produces a wave in a long spring by
   vibrating its end. As the frequency of the vibration
   is doubled, the wavelength in the spring is
   (1) quartered                (3) unchanged
   (2) halved                   (4) doubled
Answer: 2

25 Which two points on the wave shown in the
   diagram below are in phase with each other?

Answer: 4

26 As a longitudinal wave moves through a medium,
   the particles of the medium
   (1) vibrate parallel to the direction of the wave’s
       propagation
   (2) vibrate perpendicular to the direction of the
       wave’s propagation
   (3) are transferred in the direction of the wave’s
       motion, only
   (4) are stationary
Answer: 1

27 Wind blowing across suspended power lines may
   cause the power lines to vibrate at their natural
   frequency. This often produces audible sound
   waves. This phenomenon, often called an
   Aeolian harp, is an example of
   (1) diffraction          (3) refraction
   (2) the Doppler effect (4) resonance
Answer: 4

28 A student listens to music from a speaker in an
   adjoining room, as represented in the diagram
   below.
She notices that she does not have to be directly
in front of the doorway to hear the music. This
spreading of sound waves beyond the doorway is
an example of
(1) the Doppler effect (3) refraction
(2) resonance             (4) diffraction
Answer: 4

29 What is the minimum energy required to ionize
   a hydrogen atom in the n = 3 state?
   (1) 0.00 eV              (3) 1.51 eV
   (2) 0.66 eV              (4) 12.09 eV
Answer: 3

  Base your answers to questions 30 and 31 on the diagram below and on your knowledge of physics. The diagram
represents two small, charged, identical metal spheres, A and B that are separated by a distance of 2.0 meters.
30 What is the magnitude of the electrostatic force exerted by sphere A on sphere B?

Answer: 2

31 If the two spheres were touched together and then separated, the charge on sphere A would be

Answer: 1

32 The horn of a moving vehicle produces a sound of constant frequency. Two stationary observers, A and C,
   and the vehicle’s driver, B, positioned as represented in the diagram below, hear the sound of the horn.
Compared to the frequency of the sound of the horn heard by driver B, the frequency heard by observer A is
(1) lower and the frequency heard by observer C is lower
(2) lower and the frequency heard by observer C is higher
(3) higher and the frequency heard by observer C is lower
(4) higher and the frequency heard by observer C is higher
Answer: 2

33 A different force is applied to each of four different blocks on a frictionless, horizontal surface. In which
   diagram does the block have the greatest inertia 2.0 seconds after starting from rest?

Answer: 4

34 The diagram below shows a ray of monochromatic light incident on a boundary between air and glass.
Which ray best represents the path of the reflected light ray?
(1) A                                                      (3) C
(2) B                                                      (4) D
Answer: 1

35 Two pulses approach each other in the same medium. The diagram below represents the displacements
   caused by each pulse.
Which diagram best represents the resultant displacement of the medium as the pulses pass through each other?

Answer: 2


                                                   Part B–1
                                      Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (36–50): For each statement or question, choose the word or expression that, of those given, best
completes the statement or answers the question. Some questions may require the use of the 2006 Edition
Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics. Record your answers on your separate answer sheet.
36 The diameter of an automobile tire is closest to

Answer: 2

37 The vector diagram below represents the velocity
   of a car traveling 24 meters per second 35° east
   of north.
What is the magnitude of the component of the
car’s velocity that is directed eastward?
(1) 14 m/s                   (3) 29 m/s
(2) 20. m/s                  (4) 42 m/s
Answer: 1

38 Without air resistance, a kicked ball would reach a
   maximum height of 6.7 meters and land 38 meters
   away. With air resistance, the ball would travel
   (1) 6.7 m vertically and more than 38 m
       horizontally
   (2) 38 m horizontally and less than 6.7 m
       vertically
   (3) more than 6.7 m vertically and less than
       38 m horizontally
   (4) less than 38 m horizontally and less than
       6.7 m vertically
Answer: 4

39 A car is moving with a constant speed of 20. meters
   per second. What total distance does the car travel
   in 2.0 minutes?
   (1) 10. m                  (3) 1200 m
   (2) 40. m                  (4) 2400 m
Answer: 4

40 A car, initially traveling at 15 meters per second
   north, accelerates to 25 meters per second north
   in 4.0 seconds. The magnitude of the average
   acceleration is

Answer: 1

41 An object is in equilibrium. Which force vector
   diagram could represent the force(s) acting on
   the object?

Answer: 4

42 Which combination of fundamental units can be
   used to express the amount of work done on an
   object?

Answer: 3

43 Which graph best represents the relationship
   between the potential energy stored in a spring
   and the change in the spring’s length from its
   equilibrium position?

Answer: 1

44 An electric motor has a rating of 4.0 × 102 watts.
   How much time will it take for this motor to lift a
   50.-kilogram mass a vertical distance of 8.0 meters?
   [Assume 100% efficiency.]
   (1) 0.98 s                 (3) 98 s
   (2) 9.8 s                  (4) 980 s
Answer: 2

45 A compressed spring in a toy is used to launch
   a 5.00-gram ball. If the ball leaves the toy with an
   initial horizontal speed of 5.00 meters per second,
   the minimum amount of potential energy stored
   in the compressed spring was
   (1) 0.0125 J                (3) 0.0625 J
   (2) 0.0250 J                (4) 0.125 J
Answer: 3

46 A ray of yellow light ( f = 5.09 × 1014 Hz) travels
   at a speed of 2.04 × 108 meters per second in
   (1) ethyl alcohol           (3) Lucite
   (2) water                   (4) glycerol
Answer: 4

47 A blue-light photon has      a wavelength of
   4.80 × 10−7 meter. What is   the energy of the
   photon?
   (1) 1.86 × 1022 J     (3)    4.14 × 10−19 J
   (2) 1.44 × 102 J      (4)    3.18 × 10−26 J
Answer: 3

48 The graph below represents the relationship
   between the force exerted on an elevator and the
   distance the elevator is lifted.
How much total work is done by the force in
lifting the elevator from 0.0 m to 9.0 m?

Answer: 3

49 The diagram below shows waves A and B in the
   same medium.
Compared to wave A, wave B has
(1) twice the amplitude and twice the wavelength
(2) twice the amplitude and half the wavelength
(3) the same amplitude and half the wavelength
(4) half the amplitude and the same wavelength
Answer: 2

50 What is the quark composition of a proton?
   (1) uud                (3) csb
   (2) udd                (4) uds
Answer: 1


                                                 Part B–2
                                    Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (51–65): Record your answers in the spaces provided in your answer booklet. Some questions
may require the use of the 2006 Edition Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics.
   51–52 Calculate the minimum power output of an electric motor that lifts a 1.30 × 104-newton elevator car
         vertically upward at a constant speed of 1.50 meters per second. [Show all work, including
         the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
51 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
52 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 51.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 51 and 52.


53–54 A microwave oven emits a microwave with a wavelength of 2.00 × 10−2 meter in air. Calculate the
      frequency of the microwave. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
53 [1] Allow 1 credit for equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations in
       this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
54 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 53.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 53 and 54.


55–56 Calculate the energy equivalent in joules of the mass of a proton. [Show all work, including the equation
      and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
55 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
56 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s answer to question 55.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            E = 1.50 × 10−10 J
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 55 and 56.


   Base your answers to questions 57 through 59 on the information and diagram below and on your knowledge
of physics.
             A 1.5 × 103-kilogram car is driven at a constant speed of 12 meters per second counterclockwise
          around a horizontal circular track having a radius of 50. meters, as represented below.
57 On the diagram in your answer booklet, draw an arrow to indicate the direction of the velocity of
   the car when it is at the position shown. Start the arrow on the car. [1]

Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
[1] Allow 1 credit for an arrow drawn from the car with the arrowhead pointed to the left.
    Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: The arrow need not start on the car to receive this credit.


58–59 Calculate the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration of the car. [Show all work, including
      the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
58 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
59 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 58.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 58 and 59.


Base your answers to questions 60 through 62 on the information below and on your knowledge of physics.
          A football is thrown at an angle of 30.° above the horizontal. The magnitude of the horizontal
       component of the ball’s initial velocity is 13.0 meters per second. The magnitude of the vertical
       component of the ball’s initial velocity is 7.5 meters per second. [Neglect friction.]
    60 On the axes in your answer booklet, draw a graph representing the relationship between the horizontal
       displacement of the football and the time the football is in the air. [1]

Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
[1] Allow 1 credit for a straight line with a positive slope.
    Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: The line may be sketched in. It must approximate a straight line, but need not pass through
      the origin.


61–62 The football is caught at the same height from which it is thrown. Calculate the total time the football
      was in the air. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
61 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
62 [1] Allow 1 credit for a correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 61.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            t = 1.5 s
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 61 and 62.


   Base your answers to questions 63 through 65 on the information and diagram below and on your knowledge
of physics.
              A ray of light ( f = 5.09 × 1014 Hz) traveling through a block of an unknown material, passes at
          an angle of incidence of 30.° into air, as shown in the diagram below.
63 Use a protractor to determine the angle of refraction of the light ray as it passes from the unknown
   material into air. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for 56° ± 2°.


64–65 Calculate the index of refraction of the unknown material. [Show all work, including the equation and
      substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
64 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units or for an answer with units consistent with
       the student’s response to question 63. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
65 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to questions 63 and 64.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            n1 = 1.7    or   1.6
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 64 and 65.



                                                 Part C
                                   Answer all questions in this part.
    Directions (66–85): Record your answers in the spaces provided in your answer booklet. Some questions
may require the use of the 2006 Edition Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics.
  Base your answers to questions 66 through 70 on the information below and on your knowledge of physics.
              The diagram below represents a 4.0-newton force applied to a 0.200-kilogram copper block
         sliding to the right on a horizontal steel table.
66 Determine the weight of the block. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for 1.96 N or 2.0 N or 1.9 N.


67–68 Calculate the magnitude of the force of friction acting on the moving block. [Show all work, including
      the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
67 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units or for an answer, with units, consistent
       with the student’s response to question 66. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations in this
       rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
68 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to questions 66 and 67.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 67 and 68.


69 Determine the magnitude of the net force acting on the moving block. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for 3.3 N or an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 68.


70 Describe what happens to the magnitude of the velocity of the block as the block slides across
   the table. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit. Acceptable responses include, but are not limited to:
   — The magnitude of the velocity increases.
   — The block speeds up
Note: Allow credit for an answer consistent with the student’s response to question 69.


   Base your answers to questions 71 through 75 on the information and diagram below and on your knowledge
of physics.
              Two conducting parallel plates 5.0 × 10−3 meter apart are charged with a 12-volt potential
          difference. An electron is located midway between the plates. The magnitude of the electrostatic
          force on the electron is 3.8 × 10−16 newton.
71 On the diagram in your answer booklet, draw at least three field lines to represent the direction of the
   electric field in the space between the charged plates. [1]

Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for at least three arrows pointing away from the positive plate toward the negative
plate.
Examples of 1-credit responses:
Note: Use of a straightedge is not necessary to draw the field lines. Field lines near the edge of the
      plates may be curved.


72 Identify the direction of the electrostatic force that the electric field exerts on the electron. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit. Acceptable responses include, but are not limited to:
   — toward the positive plate
   — toward the top of the page
   — opposite the direction of the field


73–74 Calculate the magnitude of the electric field strength between the plates, in newtons per coulomb.
      [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
73 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
74 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 73.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 73 and 74.


75 Describe what happens to the magnitude of the net electrostatic force on the electron as the electron
   is moved toward the positive plate. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit. Acceptable responses include, but are not limited to:
   — The force will remain constant.
   — The force doesn’t change.


Base your answers to questions 76 through 80 on the information below and on your knowledge of physics.
          An electron in a mercury atom changes from energy level b to a higher energy level when the
       atom absorbs a single photon with an energy of 3.06 electronvolts.
   76 Determine the letter that identifies the energy level to which the electron jumped when the mercury
      atom absorbed the photon. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for f or energy level f.


77 Determine the energy of the photon, in joules. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW


78–79 Calculate the frequency of the photon. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution
      with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
78 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units or for an answer, with units, that is
       consistent with the student’s response to question 77. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations in
       this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
79 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to questions 78 and 79.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 78 and 79.


80 Classify the photon as one of the types of electromagnetic radiation listed in the electromagnetic
   spectrum. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for the correct answer or an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to
question 79. Acceptable response include but are not limited to:
   — visible light
   — violet


  Base your answers to questions 81 through 85 on the information and circuit diagram below and on your
knowledge of physics.
         Three lamps are connected in parallel to a 120.-volt source of potential difference, as represented
     below.
81–82 Calculate the resistance of the 40.-watt lamp. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution
      with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
81 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
82 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units or for an answer, with units, that is consistent with
       the student’s response to question 81.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            R = 360 Ω
        Note: Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 81 and 82.


83 Describe what change, if any, would occur in the power dissipated by the 100.-watt lamp if the 60.-watt
   lamp were to burn out. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for indicating that there would be no change in the power dissipated.


84 Describe what change, if any, would occur in the equivalent resistance of the circuit if the 60.-watt
   lamp were to burn out. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for indicating that the equivalent resistance would increase.


85 The circuit is disassembled. The same three lamps are then connected in series with each other and
   the source. Compare the equivalent resistance of this series circuit to the equivalent resistance of
   the parallel circuit. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
Allow 1 credit for indicating that the equivalent resistance of the series circuit would be greater than
the equivalent resistance of the parallel circuit.



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