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Global History and Geography - New York Regents August 2015 Exam

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1.
                                                  Part I
                                    Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (1–50): For each statement or question, record on your separate answer sheet the number of the
word or expression that, of those given, best completes the statement or answers the question.
1 The Europeans referred to China as the Far East.
  The Chinese referred to China as the Middle
  Kingdom. What do these terms illustrate?
  (1) The names of places refer to significant
      physical features.
  (2) Most people do not understand geography.
  (3) The point of view of people influences
      geographic labels.
  (4) Place names sometimes commemorate
      important events.
Answer: 3

2.
2 In which economic system does the government
  make most major decisions about what to produce,
  how much to produce, and for whom the goods
  and services will be produced?
  (1) traditional           (3) command
  (2) mixed                 (4) market
Answer: 3

3.
3 Throughout history, a basic purpose of government
  has been to provide
  (1) equal rights for all people
  (2) laws to maintain order
  (3) representation for all social classes
  (4) separate political and religious systems
Answer: 2


4.
4 The Neolithic Revolution is considered a turning
  point in global history because it led to
  (1) increasing migrations of people in search of
      food
  (2) increasing use of animal skins for clothing
  (3) a belief in a spiritual world
  (4) the development of civilization
Answer: 4

5.
5 The primary reason ancient peoples of the Nile
  River valley built levees, dikes, and reservoirs
  was to
  (1) purify sacred waters
  (2) create a shorter route to distant cities
  (3) defend against invaders
  (4) increase agricultural production
Answer: 4

6.
6 In the practice of religion, the Ten Commandments
  are to Christianity as the Eightfold Path is to
  (1) Buddhism                   (3) Islam
  (2) Daoism                     (4) Shinto
Answer: 1

7.
7 Mandate of Heaven, production of silk, and
  reverence for ancestors are all characteristics
  associated with civilizations in
  (1) India                   (3) Greece
  (2) China                   (4) West Africa
Answer: 2

8.
8 • Made advances in mathematics, science, and
    medicine
  • Preserved Greek and Roman learning
  • Influenced Spanish architecture and literature
  These achievements are most closely associated
  with the
  (1) Golden Age of Islam
  (2) Maya Empire
  (3) Gupta Empire
  (4) Tang dynasty
Answer: 1

9.
9 Which country has acted as a cultural bridge
  between China and Japan?
  (1) Philippines         (3) Korea
  (2) Vietnam             (4) Bangladesh
Answer: 3

10.
10 After the fall of the Mongol Empire, which city
   emerged as the new political and cultural center
   of Russia?
   (1) Moscow                (3) Novgorod
   (2) Warsaw                (4) Kiev
Answer: 1

11.
Base your answer to question 11 on the chart below and on your knowledge of social studies.
                                       Population of England
11 The population trend from 1350 to 1450 is most likely the result of the
   (1) development of trade with the Americas
   (2) raids by Vikings on coastal cities
   (3) defeat of the Spanish Armada by England
   (4) spread of the bubonic plague in England
Answer: 4

12.
12 Which characteristic was common to the cities of
   the Hanseatic League in Europe and the cities of
   the African kingdom of Ghana?
   (1) location on key trade routes
   (2) indirect control by the papacy
   (3) management of local gold mines
   (4) development as centers of woolen industry
Answer: 1

13.
13 Which leader started the Protestant Reformation
   by speaking out against papal abuses and the sale
   of indulgences in the Ninety-five Theses?
   (1) John Calvin           (3) John Wycliffe
   (2) Henry VIII            (4) Martin Luther
Answer: 4

14.
14 What was one important result of Mansa Musa’s
   pilgrimage to Mecca?
   (1) creation of a large navy
   (2) translation of the Qur’an from Arabic to Swahili
   (3) establishment of diplomatic ties with other
       Muslim states
   (4) preservation of animistic traditions in the
       Arabian Peninsula
Answer: 3

15.
Base your answer to question 15 on the map below and on your knowledge of social studies.
15 Which statement can best be supported by the information shown on this map?
   (1) The Ottoman Empire included parts of northern Africa.
   (2) The Safavid Empire controlled the entire Indian subcontinent.
   (3) The Mughal Empire occupied territory adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea.
   (4) The Ottoman Empire conquered less territory than either the Safavid or the
       Mughal Empire.
Answer: 1

16.
    Base your answers to questions 16 and 17 on the
speakers’ statements below and on your knowledge of
social studies.
Speaker A: It was a combination of the Protestant
           wind and the island nature of our nation
           that protected us. Surely, Philip must be
           upset at his defeat.
Speaker B: Our archipelago and divine winds have
           protected us once again. The Mongols
           may have taken China, but they cannot
           conquer us.
Speaker C: To support our growing population, we
           must find a suitable way to farm. With
           floating gardens on our lake, we should
           be able to grow enough to meet our
           demand.
Speaker D: We have connected highland and lowland
           areas by building networks of roads and
           bridges. We have also built terraces into
           our mountainsides to grow crops.
16 Which two speakers discuss how their society
   modified their environment?
   (1) A and B              (3) C and D
   (2) B and C              (4) D and A
Answer: 3

17.
17 Which speaker is most likely from 16th-century
   England?
   (1) A                    (3) C
   (2) B                    (4) D
Answer: 1

18.
18 Which statement best describes a key aspect of
   mercantilism?
   (1) removing tariffs to increase free trade between
       empires
   (2) acquiring colonies to provide a favorable
       balance of trade
   (3) eliminating private ownership of the means of
       production
   (4) encouraging subsistence agriculture
Answer: 2

19.
19 One way in which Suleiman the Magnificent and
   Peter the Great are similar is that they both
   (1) modernized their military
   (2) promoted free speech
   (3) isolated their people from outside influences
   (4) reduced taxes levied on their people
Answer: 1

20.
20 The Magna Carta and the English Bill of Rights
   both served to
   (1) extend the voting privileges of commoners
   (2) abolish the government’s role in levying taxes
   (3) limit the power of the monarchy
   (4) support the theory of the divine right of kings
Answer: 3


21.
21 Which individual suggested the idea that if a
   government fails to protect its people’s natural
   rights of life, liberty, and property, the people
   have the right to overthrow it?
   (1) Karl Marx
   (2) John Locke
   (3) Thomas Hobbes
   (4) Niccolò Machiavelli
Answer: 2

22.
22 One scientific belief held by both René Descartes
   and Isaac Newton is that
   (1) reasoned thought is the way to discover truth
   (2) new theories should be made to fit existing
       traditional ideas
   (3) the method by which discoveries are made is
       unimportant
   (4) difficult problems should be solved by reading
       religious texts
Answer: 1

23.
23 Simón Bolívar, Toussaint L’Ouverture, and José de
   San Martín are all associated with revolutions in
   (1) Africa                 (3) South Asia
   (2) Europe                 (4) Latin America
Answer: 4

24.
Base your answers to questions 24 and 25 on the maps below and on your knowledge of social studies.
24 Which factor provided the motivation for the changes that took place between 1858 and
   1870 as indicated on these maps?
   (1) exploration                           (3) religion
   (2) appeasement                           (4) nationalism
Answer: 4

25.
25 Which pair of individuals played a direct role in the changes that took place between
   Map A and Map B?
   (1) Otto Von Bismarck and Wilhelm II
   (2) Klemens von Metternich and Victor Emmanuel III
   (3) Camillo di Cavour and Guiseppe Mazzini
   (4) Alexander II and Frederick the Great
Answer: 3

26.
26 In the late 1700s, the Industrial Revolution
   developed in Britain because Britain
   (1) possessed key factors of production
   (2) excluded foreign investors
   (3) suppressed the enclosure movement
   (4) required a minimum wage be paid to workers
Answer: 1

27.
    Base your answers to questions 27 and 28 on
the passage below and on your knowledge of social
studies.
   … The Opium War of 1839–42 was short and
   one-sided, due to the superiority of European
   weapons, which came as a complete surprise
   to the Chinese. In the first skirmish alone, in July
   1839, two British warships defeated twenty-nine
   Chinese ships. On land, the Chinese and their
   medieval weapons were no match for British
   troops armed with state-of-the-art muskets. By
   the middle of 1842 British troops had seized
   Hong Kong, taken control of the key river deltas,
   and occupied Shanghai and several other cities.
   The Chinese were forced to sign a peace treaty
   that granted Hong Kong to the British, opened
   five ports for the free trade of all goods, and
   required the payment of reparations to the British
   in silver, including compensation for the opium
   that had been destroyed by Commissioner Lin.…
                                      — Tom Standage
27 Which term best characterizes the events
   described in this passage?
   (1) industrialization      (3) containment
   (2) imperialism            (4) cultural diffusion
Answer: 2

28.
28 What was an immediate result of the Opium War
   described in this passage?
   (1) signing the Treaty of Nanking
   (2) forming the Guomindang
   (3) beginning the Boxer Rebellion
   (4) organizing the Taiping Rebellion
Answer: 1

29.
29 Which event sparked the outbreak of World
   War I?
   (1) attack on Pearl Harbor by Japan
   (2) Germany’s invasion of Poland
   (3) Bolshevik coup d’état in Russia
   (4) assassination of the Austrian Archduke
Answer: 4

30.
30 Which agreement was labeled by the Nazis as
   unfair to Germany?
   (1) Treaty of Versailles
   (2) Soviet Nonaggression Pact
   (3) Munich Pact
   (4) Treaty of Brest-Litovsk
Answer: 1

31.
31 Japan expanded her empire in the 1930s and
   1940s to include parts of
   (1) eastern Europe and the Middle East
   (2) China and Southeast Asia
   (3) Turkey and the Soviet Union
   (4) Australia and India
Answer: 2

32.
32 Which geographic factor enabled the German
   blitzkrieg to succeed?
   (1) swift running rivers
   (2) mountain ranges
   (3) relatively flat terrain
   (4) tropical climate
Answer: 3

33.
33 Which action is most closely associated with
   totalitarian governments?
   (1) allowing public discussion of issues and
       building consensus
   (2) accepting criticism and permitting dissent
   (3) engaging in censorship and propaganda
       campaigns
   (4) having open and transparent elections with
       multiple political parties
Answer: 3

34.
34 The purpose of Mohandas Gandhi’s actions such
   as the Salt March and the textile boycott was to
   (1) begin a cycle of armed revolution
   (2) draw attention to critical issues
   (3) increase the strength of the military
   (4) resist the power of religious leaders
Answer: 2

35.
Base your answer to question 35 on the cartoon below and on your knowledge of social studies.
                               We Tried Everything but Dynamite
35 What is the main idea of this cartoon?
   (1) The United Nations is usually successful in freeing nations from communist control.
   (2) Western nations are frustrated by the strength of communist control in Eastern Europe.
   (3) Nations of the West are willing to negotiate with the Soviet Union.
   (4) The Soviet Union will usually cooperate with the United Nations.
Answer: 2


36.
36 The 38th parallel in Korea and the 17th parallel
   in Vietnam were used to mark
   (1) boundaries created by mountain ranges
   (2) demarcation lines instituted by papal authority
   (3) territorial claims disputed between ethnic
       minorities
   (4) political divisions established between
       communist and noncommunist territories
Answer: 4

37.
37 Prior to 1947, the Indian National Congress and
   the Muslim League worked together seeking
   to end
   (1) nonviolence           (3) foreign rule
   (2) religious diversity   (4) nonalignment
Answer: 3

38.
38 What was an immediate result of the Great Leap
   Forward (1958)?
   (1) independence of Kenya from Great Britain
   (2) the breakup of the Soviet Union
   (3) the relocation of Bosnian refugees
   (4) increased famine in China
Answer: 4

39.
    Base your answer to question 39 on the passage
below and on your knowledge of social studies.
   … The grim statutes [laws] that I would spend
   the rest of my life fighting stared back at me from
   the page: the value of a woman’s life was half that
   of a man (for instance, if a car hit both on the street,
   the cash compensation due to the woman’s family
   was half that due the man’s); a woman’s testimony
   in court as a witness to a crime counted only
   half as much as a man’s; a woman had to ask her
   husband’s permission for divorce. The drafters of
   the penal code had apparently consulted the
   seventh century for legal advice. The laws, in short,
   turned the clock back fourteen hundred years,
   to the early days of Islam’s spread, the days when
   stoning women for adultery and chopping off
   the hands of thieves were considered appropriate
   sentences.…
                           — Shirin Ebadi, Iran Awakening
39 Based on this passage, which statement is a valid
   conclusion about Iran following the revolution in
   1979?
   (1) Men were often penalized for their treatment
       of women.
   (2) Laws were changed to reflect Western legal
       principles.
   (3) The legal system discriminated against women.
   (4) Legal decisions were based on economic
       values.
Answer: 3

40.
40 Which sequence of 20th-century Cold War
   events is in the correct chronological order?
   (1) fall of the Berlin Wall → Cuban missile crisis →
       adoption of the Marshall Plan
   (2) Cuban missile crisis → fall of the Berlin Wall →
       adoption of the Marshall Plan
   (3) fall of the Berlin Wall → adoption of the
       Marshall Plan → Cuban missile crisis
   (4) adoption of the Marshall Plan → Cuban missile
       crisis → fall of the Berlin Wall
Answer: 4

41.
    Base your answer to question 41 on the cartoon
below and on your knowledge of social studies.
41 What is the main idea of this cartoon?
   (1) Many people have died as a result of
       consuming ethanol.
   (2) Ethanol is produced from fossils and plants.
   (3) Biofuel production is contributing to the world
       hunger problem.
   (4) Biofuel production is the source of deadly
       greenhouse gases.
Answer: 3

42.
42 “Dalit [Untouchable] Families Forbidden to Use
   Public Water-Tap”
   “Nepal Bans Bias Against Untouchables in Move to
   End Hindu Caste System”
   These headlines reflect a conflict between
   (1) traditional customs and modern law
   (2) child labor and industrialization
   (3) national self-determination and ethnic diversity
   (4) access to resources and forced migration
Answer: 1

43.
43 Which region is most closely associated with
   the expansion of the Sahel and overgrazing in
   the savanna regions?
   (1) South America       (3) Africa
   (2) China               (4) Southeast Asia
Answer: 3

44.
44 Feudalism and manorialism played an important
   role in western European society during the
   (1) medieval period
   (2) Pax Romana
   (3) Enlightenment
   (4) Age of Exploration
Answer: 1

45.
45 Pope Urban II, Saladin, and King Richard the
   Lion-Hearted are leaders associated with the
   (1) Age of Charlemagne
   (2) Crusades
   (3) Glorious Revolution
   (4) Counter Reformation
Answer: 2

46.
46 One way in which the travels of Marco Polo and
   the voyages of Zheng He are similar is that both
   (1) established colonial territories
   (2) stimulated trade
   (3) encouraged mass migrations
   (4) led to discoveries in Africa
Answer: 2

47.
47 Which civilization is credited with recording data
   with quipu, developing an elaborate road system,
   and constructing Machu Picchu?
   (1) Roman                   (3) Mesopotamian
   (2) Egyptian                (4) Inca
Answer: 4

48.
    Base your answer to question 48 on the outline
below and on your knowledge of social studies.
48 Which revolution best completes this partial
   outline?
   (1) Mexican            (3) Cuban
   (2) Chinese            (4) Iranian
Answer: 1

49.
49 Some of the ethnic strife in Africa today can be
   traced back to the European division of Africa
   resulting from the
   (1) Treaty of Tordesillas (3) Berlin Conference
   (2) Congress of Vienna (4) Yalta Conference
Answer: 3

50.
50 One way in which the Armenians in the Ottoman
   Empire (1915) and the Tutsis in Rwanda (1994)
   are similar is that both groups
   (1) sought safe haven in the Soviet Union
   (2) suffered human rights violations
   (3) seceded to create an independent state
   (4) fled to escape a severe flood
Answer: 2


51.
           Answers to the essay questions are to be written in the separate essay booklet.
In developing your answer to Part II, be sure to keep these general definitions in mind:
        (a) explain means “to make plain or understandable; to give reasons for or causes of; to
            show the logical development or relationships of ”
        (b) discuss means “to make observations about something using facts, reasoning, and
            argument; to present in some detail”
                                                   Part II
                                     THEMATIC ESSAY QUESTION
Directions: Write a well-organized essay that includes an introduction, several paragraphs addressing the task
            below, and a conclusion.
        Theme: Movement of People and Goods
                 Goods and ideas have moved from one place to another for a variety of reasons.
                 The changes that resulted from the movement of these goods and ideas to new
                 places significantly influenced groups of people, societies, and regions.
        Task:
                 Select two goods and/or ideas that moved from one place to another and for each
                 • Explain how this good or idea moved from one place to another
                 • Discuss how the movement of this good or idea significantly influenced a group
                   of people, a society, and/or a region
           You may use any goods or ideas from your study of global history and geography. Some
        suggestions you might wish to consider include the goods silk, salt, sugar, gold, wheat, oil,
        horses, and gunpowder, and the ideas of Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, and the authority of
        government comes from the people.
                                You are not limited to these suggestions.
                       Do not make the United States the focus of your answer.
        Guidelines:
                In your essay, be sure to
                • Develop all aspects of the task
                • Support the theme with relevant facts, examples, and details
                • Use a logical and clear plan of organization, including an introduction and a conclusion that
                  are beyond a restatement of the theme
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


52.
                                                Part III
                                 DOCUMENT-BASED QUESTION
    This question is based on the accompanying documents. The question is designed to test your
ability to work with historical documents. Some of these documents have been edited for the
purposes of this question. As you analyze the documents, take into account the source of each
document and any point of view that may be presented in the document. Keep in mind that the
language used in a document may reflect the historical context of the time in which it was written.
       Historical Context:
              Throughout history, leaders and governments have taken actions to increase power
              and to control their people. Three such leaders include Louis XIV of France,
              Joseph Stalin of the Soviet Union, and Pol Pot of Cambodia. The actions taken
              by these leaders and governments had a significant impact on their people and their
              society.
       Task: Using the information from the documents and your knowledge of global history,
             answer the questions that follow each document in Part A. Your answers to the
             questions will help you write the Part B essay in which you will be asked to
                Choose two leaders mentioned in the historical context and for each
                • Describe actions taken by the leader and his government to increase his power
                  and/or to control his people
                • Discuss an impact the actions had on his people or society
In developing your answers to Part III, be sure to keep these general definitions in mind:
       (a) describe means “to illustrate something in words or tell about it”
       (b) discuss means “to make observations about something using facts, reasoning, and
           argument; to present in some detail”
Part A
Short-Answer Questions
Directions: Analyze the documents and answer the short-answer questions that follow each document in the
            space provided.
Document 1
                  …How Louis obtained money enough to govern as he pleased.
        The first need of a king who wished to rule as he pleased was money. Louis had little trouble
        in raising money, for the reason that he did not need to ask for it, as the English kings did.
        The institution in France which resembled the English Parliament was the Estates General.
        But this body had never met frequently, and it could scarcely be said to exist any more,
        since it had not been assembled for nearly fifty years. Louis was therefore free to collect taxes
        and use the money as he saw fit.…
                                              Source: Carl L. Becker, Modern History, Silver, Burdett and Company
 1 According to Carl L. Becker, what was one way Louis XIV exercised power over the finances of France? [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


53.
Document 2
2 Based on the information in this graphic organizer, identify one way the rule of Louis XIV had an impact on
  France. [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


54.
Document 3
                            Revocation [removal] of the Edict of Nantes
       … As early as the 1660s the harrassment of the Huguenots [Protestants] began. It worsened
       until by the 1680s members of the “pretendedly reformed religion,” as they were
       contemptuously [scornfully] called, were threatened with the loss of their children, forced to
       quarter [house] disorderly troops in their homes, and excluded from the professions and all
       public offices. The persecution seemed to produce the desired result. On October 17, 1685,
       Louis revoked the Edict of Nantes, with the explanation that toleration was no longer needed
       since Protestantism had ceased to exist.
           The aftermath of the revocation was disastrous for France. Many of those who abjured
       [gave up] their Protestant religion repented of their weakness. They were unable to either
       return to their old faith or become genuine Catholics. Several hundred thousand Huguenots
       chose to escape to Holland, England, and Prussia. France was deprived of their considerable
       talents and energy, and her enemies were enriched thereby. Other thousands of Huguenots,
       their flights unsuccessful, were sentenced to the galleys [ships] where many quickly died from
       beatings, starvation, and overwork. Yet, almost unanimously, Louis’ contemporaries [those
       having power at the time] considered the revocation of the Edict of Nantes an admirable
       deed. It would take misfortunes in which they themselves were the sufferers to change their
       minds about the beneficence [charity] of the Sun King.…
                                 Source: Martha Glaser, “Louis XIV and the Heir Presumptuous,” Mankind Magazine
3 According to Martha Glaser, what is one impact the removal of the Edict of Nantes had on French society? [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


55.
Document 4a
Document 4b
4 Based on these documents, identify two actions Stalin took to increase his power in the Soviet Union. [2]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
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56.
Document 5
       … The purge began its last, and deadliest, phase in the spring of 1937. Until then it had
       claimed thousands of victims from among the ruling classes. Now it began to claim millions of
       ordinary citizens who had nothing to do with politics.
            Stalin knew that these people, let alone their families, hadn’t committed treason and
       probably never would. He also knew the Russian proverb: “Fear has big eyes.” He believed
       that arresting suspects for real crimes wasn’t as useful as arresting the innocent. Arresting
       someone for a crime that could be proven would allow everyone else to feel safe. And safety
       bred confidence, and confidence drew people together. Fear, however, sowed suspicion.
       It built walls between people, preventing them from uniting against his tyranny. And the best
       way to create fear was to strike the innocent. Millions of innocent lives were, to Stalin, a small
       price to pay for safeguarding his power.
            Creating fear was easy. The NKVD [Soviet secret police] had blanketed the country with
       informers. Like the secret police itself, informers were everywhere. An informer was
       stationed in every apartment house in every street in every Soviet town. Every office, shop,
       factory, and army barracks had its informers. He or she could be anyone: the janitor, the bank
       teller, the nice lady across the hall—or your best friend. Informers sat in the theaters, rode
       the trains, and strolled in the parks, eavesdropping on conversations. Although there is no way
       of checking, it was said that one person in five was a stool pigeon [informer].…
                                                                Source: Albert Marrin, Stalin, Puffin Books, 1988
5 According to Albert Marrin, what is one impact Stalin’s policy had on the Soviet Union? [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


57.
Document 6a
Document 6b
               PIG IRON AND CATTLE IN THE SOVIET UNION, 1920–1940
      … If pig iron [cast iron] is taken as a measure of industrial activity and number of cattle as
      a similar indication for agriculture, the chart reveals clearly what happened in the twenty years
      after the Revolution—an enormous build-up of heavy industry at the expense of food supplies.
      Iron mines and forges, in the disorganization of the Revolution and civil war, were producing
      almost nothing in 1920. By the late 1920s, output of pig iron regained the pre-Revolutionary
      level, but the great upsurge came with the Second Five-Year Plan. By 1940 Russia produced
      more pig iron than Germany, and far more than Britain or France. Numbers of cattle grew in
      the 1920s, but fell catastrophically during the collectivization of agriculture after 1929, and by
      1940 hardly exceeded the figure for 1920. Since 1940 the industrial development of the Soviet
      Union has been impressive, but agricultural production has continued to be a problem.…
                                       Source: Palmer and Colton, A History of the Modern World, Alfred A. Knopf
6 According to Palmer and Colton, what was one impact of Stalin’s control of the Soviet economy? [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


58.
Document 7
This passage recounts Teeda Butt Mam’s experience in April, 1975 when Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge took
over Phnom Penh, the capital city of Cambodia.
            Khmer Rouge soldiers were on the streets when I awakened before dawn. Four- to six-man
       patrols moved through the avenues and alleys of Phnom Penh evicting everyone from homes,
       shops, and shelters. No delays were permitted. No requests allowed. Troublemakers were
       killed on the spot. Often, animals were slaughtered to intimidate owners.
            Already, on this second day of evacuation, orphanages and monasteries, hotels and
       hospitals, stood empty. Within hours of the takeover, people staying in these places had been
       driven from the city at gunpoint. Doctors and staff were killed if they resisted expulsion.
       Hospital patients too weak to walk were shot in their beds. Others, carrying still-attached
       plasma bottles, hobbled from the wards. Hospital beds, filled with the sick and dying, were
       pushed through the streets by relatives and friends.…
       Source: Criddle and Mam, To Destroy You Is No Loss: The Odyssey of a Cambodian Family, Anchor Books, 1989
7 According to Teeda Butt Mam, what was one action the Khmer Rouge took to control the people of Phnom
  Penh? [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


59.
Document 8a
 Pol Pot’s Khmer Rouge government, referred to as Angka, attempted to create an agrarian society. It
 established collective farms throughout Cambodia. This passage reflects the experiences of Sopheap K. Hang
 during this time period.
        … When the registration of the remaining people was over, a leader of Angka [Khmer Rouge]
        showed up. He stood before the people holding a microphone in one hand. He gathered
        the new people [primarily city people] to listen to his speech. “I am the new leader of
        Cambodia. From now on you have to address the new government as Angka. There are no
        homes for you to return to. You have to work as a group from now on. No one can own
        property. Everything you own belongs to Angka [the government]. No more city lifestyle.
        Everyone has to dress in black uniforms.” My mother looked at my father with concern. “No
        one can question Angka,” he said. “If you have courage to question Angka, you will be taken
        to the reeducation learning institution.” That meant we would be executed. Everyone,
        including my parents, was numb. We could not think. Our bodies were shaking and our minds
        were paralyzed by the imposing speech of Angka.…
                    Source: Sopheap K. Hang, “Memoir of a Child’s Nightmare,” Children of Cambodia’s Killing Fields,
                                                                                        Yale University Press, 1997
8a According to Sopheap K. Hang, what was one action taken by Angka, Pol Pot’s government, to control
   the Cambodian people? [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


60.
Document 8b
8b Based on this illustration by Sitha Sao, state one way the actions of Pol Pot’s government affected
   the people. [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


61.
Document 9a
Document 9b
       … I initially estimated the DK [Democratic Kampuchea] death toll at around 1.5 million
       people. This estimate was based on my own detailed interviews with 500 Cambodian
       survivors, including 100 refugees in France in 1979 and nearly 400 inside Cambodia in 1980.
       It was also supported by a survey carried out among a different sample, the refugees on
       the Thai-Cambodian border. In early 1980, Milton Osborne interviewed 100 Khmer refugees
       in eight different camps. This group included 59 refugees of non-elite background: 42 former
       farmers and fishermen and 17 former low-level urban workers. Twenty-seven of these people,
       and 13 of the other 41 interviewees, had had close family members executed in the Pol Pot
       period. The 100 refugees reported a total of 88 killings of their nuclear family members. 20 of
       the interviewees (14 of them from the non-elite group) also reported losing forty nuclear
       family members to starvation and disease during the Pol Pot period. This sample of 100 families
       (around 500 people) thus lost 128 members, or about 25 percent. Projected nationally, this
       points to a toll of around 1.5 million. The 39 farmers had lost 25 (of, say, 195) family members,
       suggesting a toll of 13 percent among the Cambodian peasantry.…
                                   Source: Ben Kiernan, The Pol Pot Regime, Yale University Press, 1996 (adapted)
9 According to Ben Kiernan, what was one way the actions of Pol Pot’s government affected the people of
  Cambodia? [1]
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site


62.
Part B
Essay
Directions: Write a well-organized essay that includes an introduction, several paragraphs, and a conclusion.
            Use evidence from at least four documents in your essay. Support your response with relevant facts,
            examples, and details. Include additional outside information.
         Historical Context:
                Throughout history, leaders and governments have taken actions to increase power
                and to control their people. Three such leaders include Louis XIV of France,
                Joseph Stalin of the Soviet Union, and Pol Pot of Cambodia. The actions taken
                by these leaders and governments had a significant impact on their people and their
                society.
         Task: Using the information from the documents and your knowledge of global history,
               write an essay in which you
                  Choose two leaders mentioned in the historical context and for each
                  • Describe actions taken by the leader and his government to increase his power
                    and/or to control his people
                  • Discuss an impact the actions had on his people or society
         Guidelines:
                In your essay, be sure to
                • Develop all aspects of the task
                • Incorporate information from at least four documents
                • Incorporate relevant outside information
                • Support the theme with relevant facts, examples, and details
                • Use a logical and clear plan of organization, including an introduction and a conclusion that
                  are beyond a restatement of the theme
Answer: CLICK LINK BELOW
View MODEL Answer in the Rating Guide from Regents Web Site



  Try the Quiz :     Global History and Geography - New York Regents August 2015 Exam


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