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Physical Setting / Physics - New York Regents June 2013 Exam

Formats Worksheet / Test Paper Quiz Review

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Part A
Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (1–35): For each statement or question, choose the word or expression that, of those given, best
completes the statement or answers the question. Some questions may require the use of the 2006 Edition
Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics. Record your answers on your separate answer sheet.

1 Which term identifies a scalar quantity?
  (1) displacement         (3) velocity
  (2) momentum             (4) time
Answer: 4

2 Two 20-newton forces act concurrently on
  an object. What angle between these forces will
  produce a resultant force with the greatest
  magnitude?
  (1) 0°                  (3) 90°
  (2) 45°                 (4) 180°
Answer: 1

3 A car traveling west in a straight line on a highway
  decreases its speed from 30.0 meters per second
  to 23.0 meters per second in 2.00 seconds. The
  car’s average acceleration during this time
  interval is
  (1) 3.5 m/s2 east           (3) 13 m/s2 east
  (2) 3.5 m/s2 west           (4) 13 m/s2 west
Answer: 1


4 In a race, a runner traveled 12 meters in
  4.0 seconds as she accelerated uniformly from
  rest. The magnitude of the acceleration of the
  runner was
  (1) 0.25 m/s2           (3) 3.0 m/s2
  (2) 1.5 m/s2            (4) 48 m/s2
Answer: 2

5 A projectile is launched at an angle above the
  ground. The horizontal component of the
  projectile’s velocity, vx , is initially 40 meters per
  second. The vertical component of the projectile’s
  velocity, vy , is initially 30. meters per second.
  What are the components of the projectile’s
  velocity after 2.0 seconds of flight? [Neglect
  friction.]
  (1) vx = 40. m/s and vy = 10. m/s
  (2) vx = 40. m/s and vy = 30. m/s
  (3) vx = 20. m/s and vy = 10. m/s
  (4) vx = 20. m/s and vy = 30. m/s
Answer: 1

6 A ball is thrown with an initial speed of 10 meters
  per second. At what angle above the horizontal
  should the ball be thrown to reach the greatest
  height?
  (1) 0°                      (3) 45°
  (2) 30°                    (4) 90°
Answer: 4

7 Which object has the greatest inertia?
  (1) a 0.010-kg bullet traveling at 90. m/s
  (2) a 30.-kg child traveling at 10. m/s on her bike
  (3) a 490-kg elephant walking with a speed of
      1.0 m/s
  (4) a 1500-kg car at rest in a parking lot
Answer: 4

8 An 8.0-newton wooden block slides across a
  horizontal wooden floor at constant velocity.
  What is the magnitude of the force of kinetic
  friction between the block and the floor?
  (1) 2.4 N                (3) 8.0 N
  (2) 3.4 N                (4) 27 N
Answer: 1

9 Which situation represents a person in equilibrium?
  (1) a child gaining speed while sliding down a slide
  (2) a woman accelerating upward in an elevator
  (3) a man standing still on a bathroom scale
  (4) a teenager driving around a corner in his car
Answer: 3

10 A rock is thrown straight up into the air. At the
   highest point of the rock’s path, the magnitude of
   the net force acting on the rock is
   (1) less than the magnitude of the rock’s weight,
       but greater than zero
   (2) greater than the magnitude of the rock’s
       weight
   (3) the same as the magnitude of the rock’s
       weight
   (4) zero
Answer: 3

11 The diagram below shows a compressed spring
   between two carts initially at rest on a horizontal,
   frictionless surface. Cart A has a mass of 2 kilograms
   and cart B has a mass of 1 kilogram. A string holds
   the carts together.
The string is cut and the carts move apart.
Compared to the magnitude of the force the
spring exerts on cart A, the magnitude of the force
the spring exerts on cart B is
(1) the same                (3) twice as great
(2) half as great           (4) four times as great
Answer: 1

12 An 8.0-newton block is accelerating down a
   frictionless ramp inclined at 15° to the horizontal,
   as shown in the diagram below.
What is the magnitude of the net force causing
the block’s acceleration?
(1) 0 N                   (3) 7.7 N
(2) 2.1 N                 (4) 8.0 N

Answer: 2

13 At a certain location, a gravitational force with
   a magnitude of 350 newtons acts on a 70.-kilogram
   astronaut. What is the magnitude of the gravitational
   field strength at this location?
   (1) 0.20 kg/N               (3) 9.8 m/s2
   (2) 5.0 N/kg                (4) 25 000 N•kg
Answer: 2

14 A spring gains 2.34 joules of elastic potential
   energy as it is compressed 0.250 meter from its
   equilibrium position. What is the spring constant
   of this spring?
   (1) 9.36 N/m             (3) 37.4 N/m
   (2) 18.7 N/m             (4) 74.9 N/m
Answer: 4

15 When a teacher shines light on a photocell
   attached to a fan, the blades of the fan turn. The
   brighter the light shone on the photocell, the
   faster the blades turn. Which energy conversion
   is illustrated by this demonstration?
   (1) light → thermal → mechanical
   (2) light → nuclear → thermal
   (3) light → electrical → mechanical
   (4) light → mechanical → chemical
Answer: 3

16 Which statement describes a characteristic
   common to all electromagnetic waves and
   mechanical waves?
   (1) Both types of waves travel at the same speed.
   (2) Both types of waves require a material medium
       for propagation.
   (3) Both types of waves propagate in a vacuum.
   (4) Both types of waves transfer energy.
Answer: 4

17 An electromagnetic wave is produced by charged
   particles vibrating at a rate of 3.9 × 108 vibrations
   per second. The electromagnetic wave is classified
   as
   (1) a radio wave            (3) an x ray
   (2) an infrared wave        (4) visible light
Answer: 1

18 The energy of a sound wave is most closely
   related to the wave’s
   (1) frequency         (3) wavelength
   (2) amplitude         (4) speed
Answer: 2

19 A sound wave traveling eastward through air
   causes the air molecules to
   (1) vibrate east and west
   (2) vibrate north and south
   (3) move eastward, only
   (4) move northward, only
Answer: 1

20 What is the speed of light (f = 5.09 × 1014 Hz) in
   ethyl alcohol?
   (1) 4.53 × 10−9 m/s       (3) 1.24 × 108 m/s
   (2) 2.43 × 102 m/s        (4) 2.21 × 108 m/s
Answer: 4

21 In the diagram below, an ideal pendulum released from position A swings freely to position B.
As the pendulum swings from A to B, its total mechanical energy
(1) decreases, then increases                            (3) increases, then decreases
(2) increases, only                                      (4) remains the same
Answer: 4

22 The diagram below represents a periodic wave.
Which two points on the wave are out of phase?
(1) A and C                                      (3) C and E
(2) B and F                                      (4) D and G
Answer: 4

23 A dry plastic rod is rubbed with wool cloth and then held near a thin stream of water from a faucet. The
   path of the stream of water is changed, as represented in the diagram below.
Which force causes the path of the stream of water to change due to the plastic rod?
(1) nuclear                                              (3) electrostatic
(2) magnetic                                             (4) gravitational
Answer: 3

24 A distance of 1.0 × 10−2 meter separates successive
   crests of a periodic wave produced in a shallow
   tank of water. If a crest passes a point in the tank
   every 4.0 × 10−1 second, what is the speed of this
   wave?
   (1) 2.5 × 10−4 m/s          (3) 2.5 × 10−2 m/s
   (2) 4.0 × 10−3 m/s          (4) 4.0 × 10−1 m/s
Answer: 3

25 One vibrating 256-hertz tuning fork transfers
   energy to another 256-hertz tuning fork, causing
   the second tuning fork to vibrate. This
   phenomenon is an example of
   (1) diffraction         (3) refraction
   (2) reflection          (4) resonance
Answer: 4

26 Sound waves are produced by the horn of a truck
   that is approaching a stationary observer.
   Compared to the sound waves detected by the
   driver of the truck, the sound waves detected by
   the observer have a greater
   (1) wavelength             (3) period
   (2) frequency              (4) speed
Answer: 2

27 The electronvolt is a unit of
   (1) energy
   (2) charge
   (3) electric field strength
   (4) electric potential difference
Answer: 1

28 Which particle would produce a magnetic field?
   (1) a neutral particle moving in a straight line
   (2) a neutral particle moving in a circle
   (3) a stationary charged particle
   (4) a moving charged particle
Answer: 4

29 A physics student takes her pulse and determines
   that her heart beats periodically 60 times in
   60 seconds. The period of her heartbeat is
   (1) 1 Hz                  (3) 1 s
   (2) 60 Hz                 (4) 60 s
Answer: 3

30 Moving 4.0 coulombs of charge through a circuit
   requires 48 joules of electric energy. What is the
   potential difference across this circuit?
   (1) 190 V                 (3) 12 V
   (2) 48 V                  (4) 4.0 V
Answer: 3

31 The diagram below shows currents in a segment
   of an electric circuit.
What is the reading of ammeter A?
(1) 1 A                  (3) 9 A
(2) 5 A                  (4) 15 A
Answer: 3

32 An electric dryer consumes 6.0 × 106 joules of
   electrical energy when operating at 220 volts for
   1.8 × 103 seconds. During operation, the dryer
   draws a current of
   (1) 10. A                (3) 9.0 × 102 A
   (2) 15 A                 (4) 3.3 × 103 A
Answer: 2

33 Which net charge could be found on an object?
   (1) +4.80 × 10−19 C     (3) −2.40 × 10−19 C
   (2) +2.40 × 10−19 C     (4) −5.60 × 10−19 C
Answer: 1

34 A photon is emitted as the electron in a hydrogen
   atom drops from the n = 5 energy level directly to
   the n = 3 energy level. What is the energy of the
   emitted photon?
   (1) 0.85 eV               (3) 1.51 eV
   (2) 0.97 eV               (4) 2.05 eV
Answer: 2

35 In a process called pair production, an energetic
   gamma ray is converted into an electron and
   a positron. It is not possible for a gamma ray to be
   converted into two electrons because
   (1) charge must be conserved
   (2) momentum must be conserved
   (3) mass-energy must be conserved
   (4) baryon number must be conserved
Answer: 1


Part B–1
Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (36–50): For each statement or question, choose the word or expression that, of those given, best
completes the statement or answers the question. Some questions may require the use of the 2006 Edition
Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics. Record your answers on your separate answer sheet.

36 The approximate length of an unsharpened No. 2
   pencil is
   (1) 2.0 × 10−2 m        (3) 2.0 × 100 m
   (2) 2.0 × 10−1 m        (4) 2.0 × 101 m
Answer: 2

37 The diagram below shows an 8.0-kilogram cart
   moving to the right at 4.0 meters per second about
   to make a head-on collision with a 4.0-kilogram
   cart moving to the left at 6.0 meters per second.
After the collision, the 4.0-kilogram cart moves to
the right at 3.0 meters per second. What is the
velocity of the 8.0-kilogram cart after the collision?
(1) 0.50 m/s left           (3) 5.5 m/s left
(2) 0.50 m/s right          (4) 5.5 m/s right
Answer: 1

38 Four forces act concurrently on a block on a
   horizontal surface as shown in the diagram below.
As a result of these forces, the block
(1) moves at constant speed to the right
(2) moves at constant speed to the left
(3) accelerates to the right
(4) accelerates to the left
Answer: 4

39 If a motor lifts a 400.-kilogram mass a vertical
   distance of 10. meters in 8.0 seconds, the
   minimum power generated by the motor is
   (1) 3.2 × 102 W           (3) 4.9 × 103 W
   (2) 5.0 × 102 W           (4) 3.2 × 104 W
Answer: 3

40 A 4.0-kilogram object is accelerated at 3.0 meters
   per second2 north by an unbalanced force. The
   same unbalanced force acting on a 2.0-kilogram
   object will accelerate this object toward the north at
   (1) 12 m/s2                  (3) 3.0 m/s2
   (2) 6.0 m/s2                 (4) 1.5 m/s2
Answer: 2

41 An electron is located in an electric field of
   magnitude 600. newtons per coulomb. What is
   the magnitude of the electrostatic force acting on
   the electron?
   (1) 3.75 × 1021 N        (3) 9.60 × 10−17 N
   (2) 6.00 × 102 N         (4) 2.67 × 10−22 N
Answer: 3

42 The current in a wire is 4.0 amperes. The time
   required for 2.5 × 1019 electrons to pass a certain
   point in the wire is
   (1) 1.0 s                  (3) 0.50 s
   (2) 0.25 s                 (4) 4.0 s
Answer: 1

43 When two point charges of magnitude q1 and q2
   are separated by a distance, r, the magnitude of
   the electrostatic force between them is F. What
   would be the magnitude of the electrostatic force
   between point charges 2q1 and 4q2 when
   separated by a distance of 2r?
   (1) F                     (3) 16F
   (2) 2F                    (4) 4F
Answer: 2

44 The composition of a meson with a charge of
   −1 elementary charge could be

Answer: 1

45 Which graph represents the relationship between the kinetic energy and the speed of a freely falling object?

Answer: 3

46 Which diagram represents the electric field between two oppositely charged conducting spheres?

Answer: 3

47 Which graph represents the relationship between the magnitude of the gravitational force, Fg, between two
   masses and the distance, r, between the centers of the masses?

Answer: 4

48 The diagram below shows two waves traveling toward each other at equal speed in a uniform medium.
When both waves are in the region between points A and B, they will undergo
(1) diffraction                                        (3) destructive interference
(2) the Doppler effect                                 (4) constructive interference
Answer: 4

49 The diagram below shows a series of straight wave fronts produced in a shallow tank of water approaching
   a small opening in a barrier.
Which diagram represents the appearance of the wave fronts after passing through the opening in the
barrier?

Answer: 1

50 The graph below represents the relationship between energy and the equivalent mass from which it can be
   converted.
The slope of this graph represents
(1) c                                (3) g
(2) c2                               (4) g2
Answer: 2


Part B–2
Answer all questions in this part.
   Directions (51–65): Record your answers in the spaces provided in your answer booklet. Some questions
may require the use of the 2006 Edition Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics.

51–52 A 25.0-meter length of platinum wire with a cross-sectional area of 3.50 × 10−6 meter2 has a resistance
      of 0.757 ohm at 20°C. Calculate the resistivity of the wire. [Show all work, including the equation and
      substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
51 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
 
52 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 51.
      Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 51 and 52.


53 The diagram below represents a periodic wave moving along a rope.
On the grid in your answer booklet, draw at least one full wave with the same amplitude and half the
wavelength of the given wave. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
53 [1] Allow 1 credit for at least one complete wave with an amplitude of 0.1 m and a wavelength of 2 m,
       regardless of phase or shape.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: If more than one cycle is drawn, grade only the first cycle.


54–55 A baseball bat exerts an average force of 600. newtons east on a ball, imparting an impulse of
      3.6 newton•seconds east to the ball. Calculate the amount of time the baseball bat is in contact with
      the ball. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
54 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
 
55 [1] Allow 1 credit for a correct answer with units.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
            t = 0.0060 s    or     t = 6.0 × 10−3 s
        Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 54.
              Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 54 and 55.


56 The diagram below shows the north pole of one bar magnet located near the south pole of another
   bar magnet.
On the diagram in your answer booklet, draw three magnetic field lines in the region between the
magnets. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
56 [1] Allow 1 credit for three field lines drawn showing the correct shape and direction of the field.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:


Base your answers to questions 57 through 59 on the information and graph below.
      The graph below shows the relationship between speed and elapsed time for a car moving in a
  straight line.
                   Speed vs. Time
57 Determine the magnitude of the acceleration of the car. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
57 [1] Allow 1 credit for 1.25 m/s2 ± 0.05 m/s2.


58–59 Calculate the total distance the car traveled during the time interval 4.0 seconds to 8.0 seconds.
      [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
58 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 57.
 
59 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            d = 30. m
        Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 58.
              Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 58 and 59.


Base your answers to questions 60 through 62 on the information below.
      A 20.-ohm resistor, R1, and a resistor of unknown resistance, R2, are connected in parallel to
  a 30.-volt source, as shown in the circuit diagram below. An ammeter in the circuit reads 2.0 amperes.
60 Determine the equivalent resistance of the circuit. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
60 [1] Allow 1 credit for 15 Ω.


61–62 Calculate the resistance of resistor R2. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with
      units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
61 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
Note: Allow credit for substitution consistent with the student’s response to question 60.
62 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 61.
      Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 61 and 62.


   Base your answers to questions 63 through 65 on the information below.
          A 28-gram rubber stopper is attached to a string and whirled clockwise in a horizontal circle
      with a radius of 0.80 meter. The diagram in your answer booklet represents the motion of the
      rubber stopper. The stopper maintains a constant speed of 2.5 meters per second.
63–64 Calculate the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration of the stopper. [Show all work, including
      the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
63 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
64 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 63.
      Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 63 and 64.


65 On the diagram in your answer booklet, draw an arrow showing the direction of the centripetal force
   acting on the stopper when it is at the position shown. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
65 [1] Allow 1 credit for an arrow drawn on the string and directed toward the center of curvature or drawn
       alongside and parallel to the string.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Do not allow credit if more than one arrow is drawn, unless the correct arrow is labeled
      appropriately.



Part C
Answer all questions in this part.
    Directions (66–85): Record your answers in the spaces provided in your answer booklet. Some questions
may require the use of the 2006 Edition Reference Tables for Physical Setting/Physics.

Base your answers to questions 66 through 69 on the information below.
      Auroras over the polar regions of Earth are caused by collisions between charged particles from
  the Sun and atoms in Earth’s atmosphere. The charged particles give energy to the atoms, exciting
  them from their lowest available energy level, the ground state, to higher energy levels, excited
  states. Most atoms return to their ground state within 10. nanoseconds.
       In the higher regions of Earth’s atmosphere, where there are fewer interatom collisions, a few
  of the atoms remain in excited states for longer times. For example, oxygen atoms remain in an
  excited state for up to 1.0 second. These atoms account for the greenish and red glows of
  the auroras. As these oxygen atoms return to their ground state, they emit green photons
  ( f = 5.38 × 1014 Hz) and red photons ( f = 4.76 × 1014 Hz). These emissions last long enough to
  produce the changing aurora phenomenon.
66 What is the order of magnitude of the time, in seconds, that most atoms spend in an excited state? [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
66 [1] Allow 1 credit for −8 or 10−8.
        Note: Allow credit for a correct answer that also includes the unit “s”.
              Do not allow credit for 10 nanoseconds or a decimal form, such as 0.000000010 s.


67–68 Calculate the energy of a photon, in joules, that accounts for the red glow of the aurora. [Show all
      work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
67 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            E = hf
            E = (6.63 × 10−34 J•s)(4.76 × 1014 Hz)
68 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
            E = 3.16 × 10−19 J
        Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 67.
              Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 67 and 68.


69 Explain what is meant by an atom being in its ground state. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
69 [1] Allow 1 credit for stating that the ground state is the lowest available energy level that an atom can
       have or that the ground state is the most stable energy state.


    Base your answers to questions 70 through 75 on the information below.
          A girl rides her bicycle 1.40 kilometers west, 0.70 kilometer south, and 0.30 kilometer east in
      12 minutes. The vector diagram in your answer booklet represents the girl’s first two displacements
      in sequence from point P. The scale used in the diagram is 1.0 centimeter = 0.20 kilometer.
70–71 On the vector diagram in your answer booklet, using a ruler and a protractor, construct the following
      vectors:
       • Starting at the arrowhead of the second displacement vector, draw a vector to represent the
         0.30 kilometer east displacement. Label the vector with its magnitude. [1]
       • Draw the vector representing the resultant displacement of the girl for the entire bicycle trip and
         label the vector R. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
70 [1] Allow 1 credit for a 1.5-cm-long vector ± 0.2 cm, directed east from the arrowhead of the second
       displacement vector, and labeled 0.30 km.
71 [1] Allow 1 credit for a vector drawn from P to the tip of the arrowhead of the student’s drawn vector in
       the previous response, and labeled R.
        Example of a 1-credit response for question 70 and a 1-credit response for question 71:
Note: Deduct only 1 credit for missing labels and/or arrowheads for questions 70 and 71.


72–73 Calculate the girl’s average speed for the entire bicycle trip. [Show all work, including the equation
      and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
72 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
73 [1] Allow 1 credit for a correct answer with units.
        Examples of 1-credit responses:
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 72.
      Do not penalize the student more than one credit for errors in units in questions 72 and 73.


74 Determine the magnitude of the girl’s resultant displacement for the entire bicycle trip, in kilometers. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
74 [1] Allow 1 credit for 1.3 km ± 0.2 km or an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to
       question 71.


75 Determine the measure of the angle, in degrees, between the resultant and the 1.40-kilometer
   displacement vector. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
75 [1] Allow 1 credit for 32° ± 2° or an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 71
       (the angle at P).


Base your answers to questions 76 through 80 on the information below.
       A light ray with a frequency of 5.09 × 1014 hertz traveling in water has an angle of incidence of
   35° on a water-air interface. At the interface, part of the ray is reflected from the interface and part
   of the ray is refracted as it enters the air.
76 What is the angle of reflection of the light ray at the interface? [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
76 [1] Allow 1 credit for 35°.


77 On the diagram in your answer booklet, using a protractor and a straightedge, draw the reflected ray. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
77 [1] Allow 1 credit for drawing the reflected ray at an angle of 35° ± 2° to the normal.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 76.


78–79 Calculate the angle of refraction of the light ray as it enters the air. [Show all work, including the
      equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
78 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
79 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 78.
      Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 78 and 79.


80 Identify one characteristic of this light ray that is the same in both the water and the air. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
80 [1] Allow 1 credit for frequency, period, phase, color, or transverse.


Base your answers to questions 81 through 85 on the information and diagram below.
     A 30.4-newton force is used to slide a 40.0-newton crate a distance of 6.00 meters at constant
  speed along an incline to a vertical height of 3.00 meters.
81 Determine the total work done by the 30.4-newton force in sliding the crate along the incline. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
81 [1] Allow 1 credit for 182 J.


82–83 Calculate the total increase in the gravitational potential energy of the crate after it has slid
      6.00 meters along the incline. [Show all work, including the equation and substitution with units.] [2]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
82 [1] Allow 1 credit for the equation and substitution with units. Refer to Scoring Criteria for Calculations
       in this rating guide.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
83 [1] Allow 1 credit for the correct answer with units.
        Example of a 1-credit response:
Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s response to question 82.
      Do not penalize the student more than 1 credit for errors in units in questions 82 and 83.


84 State what happens to the kinetic energy of the crate as it slides along the incline. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
84 [1] Allow 1 credit for indicating that the kinetic energy of the crate is constant.


85 State what happens to the internal energy of the crate as it slides along the incline. [1]
Answer: MODEL ANSWER GIVEN BELOW
85 [1] Allow 1 credit for indicating that the internal energy of the crate increases.
        Note: Allow credit for an answer that is consistent with the student’s responses to questions 81 and 83.



  Try the Quiz :     Physical Setting / Physics - New York Regents June 2013 Exam


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